Sep 29, 2020  
Undergraduate Catalog 2012-2013 
    
Undergraduate Catalog 2012-2013 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Numbering System Each course in the curriculum is defined by an alphabetical prefix and a 3-digit number. The 3-digit number indicates the level of study: 100- and 200-level courses are lower division; 300- and 400-level courses are upper division; 500-, 600- and 700- level courses are graduate courses.

When a W is added to the end of the course number, this means that the course will satisfy the Writing Requirement. However, not all sections of courses with a W meet the writing requirement. Refer to the schedule of classes to see which sections of the course are designated as W.

000-level course designation Developmental courses for ESL students; placement determined by testing of entering students.

100-level course designation Courses with no prerequisites, survey courses or courses defining basic concepts and presenting the terminology of a discipline.

200-level course designation Courses of intermediate college-level difficulty, courses with 100-level course(s) as prerequisite(s) or survey courses devoted to particular areas or fields within a discipline.

300-level course designation Courses of advanced college-level difficulty taken by majors and upper-division students; these are often considered to be courses in the major, offered for students clearly interested in and qualified in the subject.

400-level course designation Advanced upper-division courses and/or seminars, tutorials and honors courses for majors and upperdivision students.

Alphabetical Prefixes The following prefixes are used, preceding the 3-digit number, to designate the field of study. They are listed here alphabetically, with the department or program and field to which they pertain. Specific departments and programs appear alphabetically in the table of contents, the index and the HEGIS Code  section. 
 

 

Psychology

Note: Letters in parentheses after course names refer to content areas: (A) = Applications of Psychology; (B) = Biopsychology; (C) = Cognitive Processes; (D/S) = Developmental/Social.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 32200 - Problems in Psycholinguistics (C)


    GER 3/B
    Psychological and psychophysical basis of language comprehension, production and acquisition from experimental and theoretical perspectives; the relationship between language and the cognitive processes of perception, memory and representation.

     
    PSYCH 24800 and 24900 or 25000, one semester of an acceptable science sequence, ENGL 12000 and declaration of a psychology major are the minimum prerequisite for all courses above PSYCH 25000. (Students falling under the previous curriculum need not fulfill the science prerequisite.)

    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 24900 or 25000, PSYCH 27000 or perm instr.

    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 32300 - Child Psychopathology (A; D/S)


    GER 3/B
    Survey and evaluation of empirical and theoretical approaches to the major psychological abnormalities that arise in childhood and adolescence; their characteristics, causes and treatments.

     
    PSYCH 24800 and 24900 or 25000, one semester of an acceptable science sequence, ENGL 12000 and declaration of a psychology major are the minimum prerequisite for all courses above PSYCH 25000. (Students falling under the previous curriculum need not fulfill the science prerequisite.)

    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 21200 or 22300, PSYCH 24900 or 25000

    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 32700 - Motivation (B; C)


    GER 3/B
    The problem of how behavior is initiated, maintained, directed and terminated. Human and non- human research evaluated.

     
    PSYCH 24800 and 24900 or 25000, one semester of an acceptable science sequence, ENGL 12000 and declaration of a psychology major are the minimum prerequisite for all courses above PSYCH 25000. (Students falling under the previous curriculum need not fulfill the science prerequisite.)

    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 24900 or 25000
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 32800 - States of Consciousness (A/C)


    GER 3/B
    The subjective and physiological aspects of consciousness; the means by which it may be altered: hypnosis, dreams, drugs, meditation and mysticism; psychosis.

     
    PSYCH 24800 and 24900 or 25000, one semester of an acceptable science sequence, ENGL 12000 and declaration of a psychology major are the minimum prerequisite for all courses above PSYCH 25000. (Students falling under the previous curriculum need not fulfill the science prerequisite.)

    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 24900 or 25000
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 34000 - Industrial and Organizational Psychology (A)


    GER 3/B
    A review of research and theories on the effects of leadership, human relations, motivation and organizational structures on behavior in business and industrial settings; applications of personnel psychology, motivational psychology and human factors engineering in the work place; job analysis, employee selection, leadership, performance appraisal, power and authority, work motivation and organizational communication.

     
    PSYCH 24800 and 24900 or 25000, one semester of an acceptable science sequence, ENGL 12000 and declaration of a psychology major are the minimum prerequisite for all courses above PSYCH 25000. (Students falling under the previous curriculum need not fulfill the science prerequisite.)

    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 24900 or 25000
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 34800 - Statistics Practicum in Psychology


    GER 3/B
    Apply and extend statistical knowledge and data analytic skills by tutoring students in PSYCH 24800  and serving as a teaching assistant forthe course. Weekly seminar meetings provide training and support. Students prepare and give statistical presentations, write homework problems, help in computer labs, and evaluate homework problems or lab assignments.

     
    prereq: PSYCH 24800 with a minimum grade of A-, perm instr.
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 35000 - Learning Theory (C)


    GER 3/B
    Theoretical and experimental approaches to human and animal learning; the relationship between systematic theory models and methodology; analysis of the historical and contemporary major contributions to learning theories.
    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 24900 or 25000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    PSYCH 35500 - Theories of Ethnic and Cultural Identity (D/S)


    GER 3/B
    Explores current psychological research and theory on ethnic and cultural identity.
     
    prereq or coreq: Declared Psychology major; completion of PSYCH 24800 and either PSYCH 24900 or PSYCH 25000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    PSYCH 36100 - Psychological Tests (A)


    GER 3/B
    Introduction to the principles of psychological assessment; major methods of measuring general ability, aptitude, achievement, interest, personality. Appraisal of psychological tests.

     
    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 24900 or 25000
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 36900 - Drugs and Behavior (B)


    GER 3/B
    Neurochemical substrate of brain functioning; historical context and social ramifications of drug use.

     
    prereq: ENGL 12000,. PSYCH 24900 or 25000, PSYCH 30000 or perm instr.
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 37000 - Psychology of Cognitive Development (C; D/S)


    GER 3/B
    A comparative information processing perspective on the development of mental structure and functioning, including perception, memory, problem solving, self-awareness of thinking, intelligence, concept formation and language development.

     
    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 24900 or 25000, PSYCH 27000 or perm instr.
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 38000 - Microcomputers in Psychological Research


    GER 3/B
    An introduction to the fundamentals of microcomputer programming and digital electronics, including the structure of a computer language (BASIC), digital logic, interfacing and computer memory. Students learn to program psychological experiments, collect data, perform statistical analyses and control peripheral devices by microcomputer. Designed for advanced undergraduates.

     
    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 24900 or 25000, perm instr.
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 39000 - Special Topics in Psychology III


    GER 3/B
    Readings and discussion on a selected problem or topic area. Topics vary from semester to semester.
    prereq: ENGL 12000, PSYCH 24900 or 25000, perm instr.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    PSYCH 39500 - Independent Research in Psychology


    May be applied to the major once. Designed to meet the needs and interests of individual students under the direction of a particular instructor at a more advanced level than PSYCH 20100 . Such study may involve independent reading, tutorials, independent research projects, or participation in ongoing faculty research, any of these culminating in an APA-style research report or literature review. Field Placements (internships) cannot be granted credit as PSYC 39500; however, supervised field Placement taken in conjunction with PSYCH 36100 - Psychological Tests (A)  will be granted credit as PSYC 395.
    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 24900 or 25000, perm instr.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    PSYCH 39600 - Honors in Psychology


    Independent, sponsored, empirical research and seminar. Students are expected to attend the regularly scheduled seminar. An APA-style research report or its equivalent (to be filed in the department) is a requirement of this course. To graduate with departmental honors, the student must receive a grade of A in PSYCH 39600. Honors in Psychology is typically a one-semester course; however, when a PSYCH 39600 research project extends beyond a single semester, the student may (with permission) register for a second semester as PSYCH 39800 . If taken, the student must receive a grade of A in both PSYCH 39600 and 39800 to graduate with departmental honors.
    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 24900 or 25000; 3.5 major GPA; 3.00 cumulative GPA; perm instr.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    PSYCH 39800 - Honors in Psychology


    Independent sponsored research and seminar. Attendance at regularly scheduled seminar and research report required. If taken, the student must receive a grade of A in both PSYCH 39600  and 39800 to graduate with departmental honors.


     
    prereq: PSYCH 39600, perm instr.
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PSYCH 40000 - Special Topics in Psychology IV


    GER 3/B
    Readings and discussion on a selected problem or topic area. Topics vary from semester to semester.
    prereq: ENGL 12000. PSYCH 24900 or 25000, perm instr.
    3 hrs 3 cr.

Public Policy

  
  •  

    PUPOL 10000 - Introduction to Public Policy


    An interdisciplinary introduction to public policy utilizing the literature and tools of a variety of social science disciplines. This course introduces students to basic concepts and approaches in public policy. It will acquaint students with public policy as a field of study, the basic elements of the policy making process, and distinct modes for analyzing public policy and its outcomes. It will be team-taught by faculty from at least two related social science disciplines.

    Writing Requirements:This course will require 20 to 25 pages of writing in the form of two take home essay examinations (4-5 pages each), a proposal for a final paper (3-5), and a final paper (8-10 pages).

     
    Open only to students enrolled in the program. Cannot be used to fulfill any other requirements.
    This course is taken at the state of the art Roosevelt House.

    prereq: declaration of a minor/certificate in Public Policy and a minimum GPA requirement of 3.0
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    PUPOL 40000 - Capstone Seminar


    This writing intensive course is the culminating experience in the Public Policy minor/certificate. It provides students with an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills acquired in their other courses to a specific policy problem. An interdisciplinary course, it will require students to make an inquiry into a specific policy problem. The project will be overseen jointly by a faculty adviser who specializes in the substantive area of public policy chosen and another faculty adviser in the program by writing a formal paper.

    Each student will write an appropriately revised 5-7 page research proposal and a 20-25 page research paper involving primary research.
    These courses are only open to students enrolled in the program. They cannot be used to fulfill any other requirements.
    This course is taken at the state of the art Roosevelt House.

    prereq: Students must have completed 45 credits, have a declared major, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
    3 hours 3 credits


Religion: Introduction to the Field of Religion

  
  •  

    REL 11000 - Nature of Religion (W)


    GER 2/C
    Study of basic facets of religion: God, ethics, worship, faith, myth, ritual, symbolism, etc.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 11100 - Approaches to Religion (W)


    GER 2/C
    Different understandings of religion: sociological, anthropological, psychological, philosophical, theological.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.

Religion: Theoretical Studies in Religion

  
  •  

    ANTHC 30700 - Anthropology of Religion


    GER 3/B PD/A
    Emphasis on non-Western societies; theories of religion, magic; functions and symbolic meaning.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 26000 - Special Topics: Theoretical Studies in Religion


    Specialized study of a methodological approach to the study of religion. Different topic each time offered.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 27000 - Religion and Psychology (W)


    GER 2/C PD/D
    An examination of ways in which psychology understands, describes, values (or devalues) religion using the media of text, story and film.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 36000 - Special Topics: Theoretical Studies in Religion


    GER 3/A
    Specialized study of a methodological approach to study of religion. Different topic each time offered.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 39000 - Modern Theories of Religion (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    An interdisciplinary continuation of the study of methodological and theoretical issues begun in REL 11100 , focusing on current debates and contemporary literature.
     
    prereq: ENGL 12000, REL 11100
    3 hrs 3 cr.

Religion: Issues in Religion

  
  •  

    REL 20400 - Religious Experience (W)


    GER 2/C PD/D
    Cross-cultural analysis of religious experiences: Biblical, ancient Greek, Asian, modern Western.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 20500 - Faith and Disbelief (W)


    GER 2/C PD/D
    Examination of questions of faith and disbelief in modern Western thought.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 20600 - Ideas of God in Contemporary Western Thought (W)


    GER 2/C PD/D
    Survey of representative schools of current Western religious thought: Christian theism, metaphysical protest, process theology, feminist theology, liberation theology, beyond theism thought.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 20700 - Religious Sources for Morality (W)


    GER 2/C PD/D
    Religious reasons for determining good and evil; religious sources for ethical decisions.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 20800 - Religion and Social Justice (W)


    GER 2/B PD/D
    An exploration into religious perspectives on such social issues as war, race, the economy and gender relations.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 20900 - Religion and Human Rights (W)


    GER 2C
    It has been contended that religious beliefs about the natural and moral order, as well those concerning human nature, lie at the foundation of the idea of human rights. Some histories of human rights even begin with a survey of the teachings of various major religious traditions. And, as the idea of, and movements for, international human rights swept the globe in the latter parts of the 20th century, scholars and religious thinkers examined and assessed the confluence of the world’s religious systems of thought, conscience, and belief with the norms and standards of the human rights project. Yet, even as religious thinkers and leaders contribute significantly to human rights movements around the world, some human rights norms—for example, those prohibiting gender- or religion-based discrimination, prohibitions on certain forms of punishment—seem to conflict head on with the strictures of various religions. This course will examine these various intersections.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 26100 - Special Topics: Issues in Religion


    Study of particular religious topics or thinkers. Different subject each time offered.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 30700 - Religious Ideas in Modern Literature (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    Exploration of religious themes in modern literature.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 30800 - Religion and the Arts (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    Examination of religious themes in art, music, theatre, cinema, or literature. Different topics each time offered.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 30900 - The Religious Meanings of Love and Sex (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    Interdisciplinary investigation of the major ways humankind has understood the relation between the sexually erotic and religious realities.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 31000 - The Religious Meanings of Death (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    Consideration of the meaning of death in major world religions.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 31100 - Women and Religion (W)


    GER 3/A PD/C
    An examination of the role of women and the concept of the feminine in world religions.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 31200 - Religion and Politics (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    The role of political ideology in the shaping of religious belief and theology’s influence on politics in Western and non-Western traditions, both conservative and radical.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 31300 - Spirit and Nature (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    An exploration of the ideas of nature and animal life in a representative sampling of the religious traditions of the world, inquiring into the implications for environmental policy and the treatment of animals.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 31500 - The Problem of Evil (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    Exploration of the religious meaning of evil in different cultures.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 33400 - Mysticism (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    Cross-cultural exploration of mystical experience and mystical doctrines, as well as an exploration of the various methods of studying them.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 33500 - Myth and Ritual (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    Cross-cultural exploration of myth and ritual and their place in various cultures; methodologies for analysis.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 34000 - Homosexuality in World Religions (W)


    GER 3/A PD/C
    A survey and analysis of typical ways in which homosexuality has been understood, evaluated and in some cases institutionalized in a variety of religious traditions, attending especially to implicit constructions of gender.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 36100 - Special Topics: Issues in Religion


    GER 3/A
    Study of particular religious topics or thinkers. Different subject each time offered.
    3 hrs 3 cr.

Religion: Religious Traditions

  
  •  

    HIST 31500 - Christianity in Modern Times


    GER 3/B
    Not offered to freshmen. Transformation of Christianity since the Reformation, Enlightenment and modern political and intellectual challenges.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 258 - Religions of Ancient Europe (W)


    GER 2C P/D D
    Exploration of the religions of Europe before influence of the Classical Greek, Roman and Christian worlds. Areas covered include the material culture of pre-literate peoples–the prehistoric cave art of the Upper Paleolithic and farming settlements of the British Isles, Central Europe, Iberia, Scandinavia, the Balkans and Eastern Europe–as well as ancient texts revealing beliefs and practices which pre-exist Christian influence and are foundational for future cultural developments.   
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 21100 - The Sacred Sky: Astrology in World Religions (W)


    GER 2C
    Astrology is a belief system that exists cross-culturally because the sky is an omnipresent cultural resource, and while different civilizations have varied beliefs about the meaning of celestial activity, those beliefs share a common thread: the sky is sacred, and celestial activity is an expression of that sacrality. The names of the planets and the stars, as well as their myths and stories may differ from tradition to tradition, but ancient astronomers of every culture studied celestial motion, detected patterns, understood those patterns to be cyclical, and believed they formed the basis of an orderly and precise cosmology.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 25100 - Asian Religions (W)


    GER 2/C PD/A
    Study of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Taoism and Confucianism.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 25200 - Ancient Near Eastern Religions (W)


    GER 2/C PD/A
    Study of Egyptian religion, religions of Sumer and Babylonia, religion of the early Hebrews (including the Old Testament).
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 25300 - Abrahamic Religions (W)


    GER 2/C PD/D
    Study of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam– with some considerations of Zoroastrian parallels.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 25400 - Tribal Religions: From Australia to the Americas (W)


    GER 2/C PD/A or B
    Study of indigenous religions of Pacific Islanders and North American Indians.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 25500 - Religions of Two Gods (W)


    GER 2/C PD/A
    A survey of historical varieties of dualistic religion both classical and modern which inquires into the moral grounds for their recurring appeal.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 25600 - Afro-Caribbean Religions (W)


    GER 2/C PD/B
    An introduction to the diversity of African-based religions in the Caribbean and beyond.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 25700 - Religions of Ancient Central and South America (W)


    GER 2C P/D B
    Exploration of the religious traditions of several pre-Columbian cultures of Central and South America using both material culture and texts, and raising such central questions in the study of religion as the nature of cosmologies and their relation to ritual, architecture, and social organization .
    The course will also briefly consider if the thread of Mesoamerican, Central and South American religions still holds in the modern age, whether in modern syncretic religious movements or pockets of traditional life-ways.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 25800 - Religions of Ancient Europe (W)


    Exploration of the religions of Europe before influence of the Classical Greek, Roman and Christian worlds. Areas covered include the material culture of pre-literate peoples–the prehistoric cave art of the Upper Paleolithic and farming settlements of the British Isles, Central Europe, Iberia, Scandinavia, the Balkans and Eastern Europe–as well as ancient texts revealing beliefs and practices which pre-exist Christian influence and are foundational for future cultural developments.   
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    REL 26200 - Special Topics: Religious Traditions


    Specialized study of specific religious traditions or groups of traditions. Different topic each time offered.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 31400 - Religion and Sports (W)


    GER 3A
    A study of sport using the methods and concerns of scholarship in religion, considering sports as a form of religious expression; and reflexively, an introduction to the concerns and methods of the academic study of religion by means of a concentration on sport. Course foci: a) the meaning of sport forms derivative of its religious setting in a sampling of traditional cultures; b) the values expressed in sport forms considered as rituals; c) the rise of team sports against the background of the reconsideration of the importance of the body in 19th century Western religion, and the emergence of the modern Olympic movement as part of a search for a religious alternative; and d) an arguable implicit spirituality of sport.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 32000 - Hinduism (W)


    GER 3/A PD/A
    Study of Hinduism, its development, history, literature, philosophy and religious practices.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 32100 - Buddhism (W)


    GER 3/A PD/A
    Study of Buddhism, its development, history, literature, philosophy and religious practices.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 32200 - Islam (W)


    GER 3/A PD/A
    Study of Islam, its development, history, literature, philosophy and religious practices.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 32300 - Christianity (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    Analysis of the Christian religion which employs methodologies of the academic study of religion and which aims to uncover the unity of Christian faith embodied in its various expressions.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 32400 - Islam and Buddhism (W)


    GER 3/A PD/A
    Study of Islam and Buddhism, their founders, development, beliefs, rituals and interaction.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 32600 - Religious Meanings of the Qur’ān (W)


    GER 3A
    This course introduces students to the study of the Qur’ān based on the traditional Islamic “sciences of the Qur’ān” (`Ulūm al-Qur’ān). Using an introductory text on the Qur’ānic sciences, the course will introduce the traditional areas of concern in the Qur’ānic sciences: the revelation, transmission, form, language and style, hermeneutics, and principles and types of exegesis. The course will continue by introducing students to representative examples of the types of material referred to in the textbook. This material is chosen on the basis of (1) interest, (2) accessibility (especially the availability of English translations) and (3) the ability to give students some exposure to the variety of styles and approaches to the material available in the literature, introducing the students to representative examples of the types of material referred to in the introductory text. This material provides students with illustrative exposure to both classical and modern Muslim approaches to the Qur’ān and its exegesis.
    prereq: Engl 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 33000 - New Testament Religion (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    Scholarly consideration of religion of New Testament: the mystery of Jesus Christ, Paul’s message, ethics, relation to the Law of Judaism, salvation theology, apocalyptic thinking.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 33300 - Christian Theology (W)


    GER 3/A PD/D
    An examination of key doctrines in Christian thought such as trinity, incarnation, existence of God and grace.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 33600 - Zen (W)


    GER 3/A PD/A
    An inquiry into the teachings of Chinese and Japanese Zen in light of their Buddhist and Daoist backgrounds.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 33700 - Sufism (W)


    GER 3/A PD/A
    A course on the esoteric or mystical dimension of Islam, known among Muslims as ta/awwuf, attending to the history, doctrine and metaphysics of the Sufi path.
    prereq: ENGL 12000
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 36200 - Special Topics: Religious Traditions


    GER 3/A
    Specialized study of specific religious tradition or groups of traditions. Different topic each time offered.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 41000 - Independent Study in Religion


    Open to majors only. Individual research and writing on topic in religion under supervision of a religion professor.
     
    May be taken a second or third time with another subject.
    prereq: perm chair
    hrs TBA 1-6 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 45000 - Honors Seminar in Religion


    Specialized study in religion. For religion majors or other advanced religion students. Different topic each time offered. May be taken a second or third time with another subject. One topic offered under REL 45000 or 49000 satisfies the course requirements for departmental honors.
    prereq: five courses in religion or a major/CUNY-BA focus in religion and perm instr. or program director
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    REL 49000 - Honors Tutorial in Religion


    Open to majors only. Individual research and writing on topic in religion under supervision of Religion Honors Committee. REL 49000 or one topic offered under REL 45000 satisfies the course requirements for departmental honors.
    prereq: perm chair
    hrs TBA 3-6 cr.

Romance Languages: Division I: French

There are three options for students beginning French at Hunter. A regular sequence (FREN 10100  FREN 10200  FREN 20100  FREN 20200 ), an intensive sequence (FREN 10300  FREN 20300 ) which covers in two semesters material normally covered in four and a course for students who use French as a heritage language.

  
  •  

    FREN 10100 - Elementary French I


    Language lab mandatory. Not credited without FREN 10200.

     
    There are three options for students beginning French at Hunter. A regular sequence (FREN 10100, 10200, 20100, 20200), an intensive sequence (FREN 10300, 20300) which covers in two semesters material normally covered in four and a course for students who use French as a heritage language.
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    FREN 10200 - Elementary French II


    Language lab mandatory.

     
    There are three options for students beginning French at Hunter. A regular sequence (FREN 10100, 10200, 20100, 20200), an intensive sequence (FREN 10300, 20300) which covers in two semesters material normally covered in four and a course for students who use French as a heritage language.
    prereq: FREN 101 or one yr high school French.
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    FREN 10250 - Beginning French Conversation and Cultural Enrichment


    Not credited toward language requirement. Conversational practice, cultural texts and activities for second-semester French students.
    There are three options for students beginning French at Hunter. A regular sequence (FREN 10100, 10200, 20100, 20200), an intensive sequence (FREN 10300, 20300) which covers in two semesters material normally covered in four and a course for students who use French as a heritage language.
    coreq: FREN 10200
    2 hrs 2 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 10300 - Intensive Elementary French


    Equivalent to material covered in 10100 and 10200. Language lab mandatory.
    There are three options for students beginning French at Hunter. A regular sequence (FREN 10100, 10200, 20100, 20200), an intensive sequence (FREN 10300, 20300) which covers in two semesters material normally covered in four and a course for students who use French as a heritage language.
    6 hrs 6 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 20100 - Intermediate French I


    Language lab mandatory.
    There are three options for students beginning French at Hunter. A regular sequence (FREN 10100, 10200, 20100, 20200), an intensive sequence (FREN 10300, 20300) which covers in two semesters material normally covered in four and a course for students who use French as a heritage language.
    prereq: FREN 10200 or two yrs high school French
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 20200 - Intermediate French II


    Language lab mandatory.
    There are three options for students beginning French at Hunter. A regular sequence (FREN 10100, 10200, 20100, 20200), an intensive sequence (FREN 10300, 20300) which covers in two semesters material normally covered in four and a course for students who use French as a heritage language.
    prereq: FREN 2000 or three yrs high school French
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 20300 - Intensive Intermediate French


    Equivalent to material covered in 20100 and 20200. Language lab mandatory.
    There are three options for students beginning French at Hunter. A regular sequence (FREN 10100, 10200, 20100, 20200), an intensive sequence (FREN 10300, 20300) which covers in two semesters material normally covered in four and a course for students who use French as a heritage language.
    prereq: FREN 10200 or two yrs high school French
    6 hrs 6 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 20800 - French for Francophones


    An intermediate-level language course designed for French speakers who have acquired the language in the family, local Francophone communities or abroad. Emphasizes the development of oral and written skills to the advanced level through interviews, readings and writing assignments. Spelling and grammar are also highlighted.
    prereq: intermediate-level ability as determined by dept. exam or interview; perm dept.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 21100 - Intermediate Grammar and Composition


    Continued study of grammar and syntax, with focus on reading and writing. Intended for French majors and minors.

     
    prereq: FREN 202, 203, or placement by departmental adviser
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    FREN 22000 - Advanced French Conversation


    prereq: FREN 20200 or four yrs high school French
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 24100 - Early French Civilization: From Gothic to Revolution


    GER 2/C PD/D
    Conducted in English; readings in English.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 24200 - Modern French Civilization: From Revolution to Present


    GER 2/C PD/D
    Conducted in English; readings in English.
    There are three options for students beginning French at Hunter. A regular sequence (FREN 10100, 10200, 20100, 20200), an intensive sequence (FREN 10300, 20300) which covers in two semesters material normally covered in four and a course for students who use French as a heritage language.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 25100 - French Literature and the Arts


    PD/D
    Conducted in English; readings in English and French. Particular attention to theme, image and structure as they may be compared in literary and artistic works.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 25200 - From Symbolism to Surrealism in French Literature


    GER 3/A
    Conducted in English; readings in English. Impressionist, symbolist, cubist, Dada and surrealist movements in literature and art from the late 19th to 20th century.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 25300 - Modern French Theatre: Theory and Practice


    GER 3/A PD/D
    Conducted in English. Giraudoux, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco.
    4 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 25400 - Film and the French Novel


    GER 3/A PD/D
    Conducted in English. Truffaut, Godard, Resnais, Robbe-Grillet and others.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 25500 - New Approaches to Modern French Literature


    GER 3/A
    Conducted in English; readings in French and English. Investigation of various currents of 20th century literary and aesthetic criticism as practiced in France.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 25600 - Dream and Image (W)


    GER 3/A
    Conducted in English. Analysis of literary representations of dreams. Exploration of the relationship between word and image in French Literature. Such authors as Flaubert, Maupassant, Nerval and Proust.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 25700 - Literary Cross-Currents


    Conducted in English. Topics: Interaction of French and Russian literature, of French and American literature; the myth of Germany in French literature; Shakespeare in France; Dante and French literature.
    prereq: reading knowledge of French
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 25800 - French Poetry in Translation


    Conducted in English. Study of major themes, theories and texts from 16th century to contemporary period.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 25900 - French Theatre in Translation


    PD/D
    Conducted in English; readings in English. Development of French theatre from 17th to 20th century. Great plays that have become known in English translation.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 26000 - French Novel in Translation (1600-1900)


    PD/D
    Readings in English; conducted in English. Development and evolution of French novel; its relationship to other literary genres.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 26100 - Modern French Novel in Translation (1900-Present)


    PD/D
    Conducted in English; readings in English. From Gide and Proust to present.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 26200 - Perspectives on Women in French Literature


    GER 3/A PD/C or D
    The representation of women in literary texts from the Middle Ages to the present. Conducted in English. Readings in English translation.


    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 27500 - Introduction to French Literature


    PD/D
    Conducted in French. Introduction to literary texts and analysis using outstanding works of French literature in all genres from across centuries. Emphasis on reading comprehension and explication de texte.

     
    prereq: FREN 20200 or four yrs high school French
    3 hrs 3 cr.

  
  •  

    FREN 31100 - Advanced French Grammar


    prereq: FREN 20200
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 31200 - French Oral and Written Expression


    prereq: FREN 20200 or equiv.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
  
  •  

    FREN 32100 - French Translation


    prereq: FREN 20200 or equiv.
    3 hrs 3 cr.
 

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